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4-DV Statistics

SOME FACTS ABOUT DV

Females were victims of 3 of every 4 intimate murders and 85% of the victims of non-lethal intimate violence. 

A woman is 9 times more likely to be attacked in her own home than in the streets.

25% of all female psychiatric patients who attempt suicide are victims of Domestic Violence.

85% of women in substance abuse programs are victims of Domestic Violence.

Almost 80% of all serious injury and death occur when Battered women try to leave or after they leave.

A third of all divorces are sought by women on grounds of physical cruelty.

Battered women seek 50,000 orders of protection each week in the U.S. in an effort to stop violence.

40% of all homeless families in major cities are fleeing Domestic Violence.

50-70% of men who abuse women also abuse children.

50% of children in foster care are there because of Domestic Violence.

70% of child abuse is committed by the man of the house.

There were over 4 million reported domestic assaults on women last year. 20% of those resulted in serious injury.

Over a third of the women in hospital emergency rooms at any given time are there because of Domestic Violence.

It costs 3-5 billion dollars a year to put these women back together.

From Domestic Violence for Beginners by Alisa Deltufo

 

Oregon Domestic Violence Needs Assessment 1998

Oregon Domestic Violence Needs Assessment 1998 was conducted for the Oregon Governor’s Council on Domestic Violence.  The overall goals of the assessment were to learn more about the scope of the problem of DV in Oregon and to inform policies and program aimed at reducing and preventing DV.  Information was gathered thru telephone interviews of 18,55 women (18 and 64 years of age) and mailed survey to 365 agencies through out Oregon.  For the purposes of this assessment, domestic violence was defined as physical abuse, and included physical assault, sexual coercion, and injury.  The findings indicate that:1) domestic violence towards women is common in Oregon; 2) victims of domestic violence try to protect themselves, but the most frequently sought sources of support and protection are not the most helpful; 3) individuals and agencies that can help victims need more information about domestic violence and knowledge of community resources that they currently have; and 4) many domestic violence-related services are unavailable or inadequate in counties throughout Oregon.  Following is a brief overview of findings.

 

·       More than 1 of every 8 (13.3% or 132,000) Oregon women 18 to 34 years of age are estimated to have been victims of physical abuse by an intimate partner during the past year.

·       Sixty percent of Oregon children under 18 years of age living in abusive households are estimated to have seen or heard the abuse of their mothers of care givers during the past year. 

·       Victims represent all social & economic groups both urban & rural areas of all regions of Oregon.  90% of Oregon victims are white, 63% are employed, 47% have at least some college education, 43% have annual household incomes of at least $35,000, & 39% are married. 90% of the partners of abused women are male. 

·       Abusive partners represent all social and economic groups.  86% of abusive partners are white, 80% are employed, and 37% at least some college education. 

·       More than 90% of abused  women seek support & protection, but the most frequently sough sources are not the most helpful.  They most often turn to family & friends (80%), followed by  police (3%), mental health providers (34%), & supervisors and coworkers (32%).  While only 11% call victims’ programs or shelters, they are the most likely of all sources to be supportive & respectful, provide information on services, & offer immediate help.  

 

The findings of the Assessment suggest several directions to reduce the prevalence of DV in Oregon.  Recommendations include: Increasing public awareness, providing staff training, enhancing support services and educating young people.

-from 1998 Oregon DV Needs Assessment - Executive Summary

 

National Statistics

SAME-SEX BATTERING

Domestic violence occurs within same-sex relationships with the same statistical frequency as in heterosexual relationships.

·       the prevalence of domestic violence among Gay and Lesbian couples is approximately 25 - 33%.  (Barnes, It’s Just a Quarrel’, American Bar Association Journal, February 1998, p. 25.)

  • battering among Lesbians crosses age, race, class, lifestyle and socio-economic lines. (Lobel, ed., Naming the Violence: Speaking Out About Lesbian Battering, p.183 (1986).)

    ·       each year, between 50,000 and 100,000 Lesbian women and as many as 500,000 Gay   men are battered. (Murphy, Queer Justice: Equal Protection for Victims of Same-sex Domestic Violence,30 Val. U.L. rev. 335) 

·       while same-sex battering mirrors heterosexual battering both in type and prevalence, its victims receive fewer protections. (Barnes, It’s Just A Quarrel’,American Bar Association Journal,  February 1998, p. 24.)

·       many battered Gays or Lesbians fight back to defend themselves - it is a myth that same-sex battering is mutual. (Murphy, Queer Justice: Equal Protection for Victims of Same-sex Domestic Violence, 30 Val. U. L. Rev. 335 (1995).)

·       same-sex batterers use forms of abuse similar to those of heterosexual batterers.  they have an additional weapon in the threat of “outing” their partner to family, friends, employers or community. (Lundy, Abuse That Dare Not Speak Its Name: Assisting Victims of Lesbian and Gay Domestic Violence in Massachusetts, 28 New Eng. L. Rev. 273 (Winter 1993).)

SEPARATION  VIOLENCE

When a woman leaves her batterer, her risk of serious violence or death increases dramatically.

·       separated/divorced women are 14 times more likely than married women to report having been a victim of violence by their spouse or ex-spouse. (Bureau of Justice  Statistics: Female victims of  Violent Crime, 1991.)

·       women separated from their husbands were 3 times more likely to be victimized by spouses than divorced women, and 25 times more likely to be victimized by spouses than married women. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against women: Estimates from the Redesigned Survey (NCJ-154348), August 1995,p.4.)

·       65% of intimate homicide victims physically separated from the perpetrator prior to their death. (Florida Governor’s Task Force on Domestic and Sexual Violence, Florida Mortality Review Project, 1997.)

HOMICIDE

Domestic homicide is often the culmination of an escalating history of abuse.

·       female homicide victims are more than twice as likely to have been killed by an intimate partner than are male homicide victims. (Bureau of Justice Statistics: Female Victims of Violent Crime, December, 1996.)

·       88% of victims of domestic violence fatalities had a documented history of physical abuse. (Florida Governors Task Force on Domestic and Sexual Violence, Florida Mortality Review Project, 1997, pp. 46-48, tables 14-21.)

·       44% of victims of intimate homicides had prior threats by the killer to kill victim or self.  30% had prior police calls to the residence.  17% had a protection order. (Florida Governor’s Task Force on Domestic and Sexual Violence, Florida Mortality Review Project, 1997, pp. 46-48, tables 14-21.)

·       70% of intimate-partner homicide victims are women.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics Selected Findings: Violence Between Intimates (NCJ-149259) November, 1994.)

RACE

Race is not indicative of who is at risk of domestic violence.

·       domestic violence is statistically consistent across racial and ethnic boundaries. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against Women: Estimates from the Redesigned Survey (NCJ-154348), August 1995, p.3.)

AGE

Batterers and victims may experience domestic violence at any age.

·       women ages 19-29 reported more violence by intimates than any other age group.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against Women:  Estimates from the Redesigned Survey (NCJ-154348), August 1995, p.4.)

·       in a 1990 restraining order study, the age of abusers ranged from 17-70.  two-thirds of the abusers were between the ages 24 and 40. (Buzawa & Buzawa ed., Do Arrests and Restraining Orders Work? (1996), p. 195.)

PREVALENCE

Domestic violence crosses ethnic, racial, age, national origin, sexual orientation, religious and socioeconomic lines .

·       By the most conservative estimate, each year 1 million women suffer nonfatal violence by an intimate. (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against Women: Estimates from the Redesigned Survey  (NCJ- 154348), August 1995, p.3.)

·       By other estimates, 4 million American women experience a serious assault by an intimate partner during an average 12-month period. (American Psychl. Ass’n, Violence and the Family : Report of the American Psychological Association Presidential Task Force on Violence and the Family. (1996), p. 10.)

·       Nearly 1 in 3 adult women experience at least one physical assault by a partner during adulthood. (Same as above.)

GENDER

An overwhelming majority of domestic violence victims in heterosexual relationships are women.

·       90 - 95% of domestic violence victims are women.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics Selected findings: Violence between Intimates (NCJ-149259), November 1994.)

·       much of female violence is committed in self-defense, and inflicts less injury than male violence. (Chalk & King, eds., Violence in Families: Assessing Prevention & Treatment Programs, National Resource Council and Institute of Medicine, p. 42 (1998).)

·       male perpetrators are 4 times more likely to use lethal violence than females. (Florida Governor’s Task Force on Domestic and Sexual Violence, Florida Mortality Review Project, 1997.)         

DATING VIOLENCE

Violence against intimates may occur even though the victim does not live with her abuser.

·       violence against women occurs in 20% of dating couples. (American Psychl. Ass’n, Violence and the Family: Report of the American Psychological Association Presidential Task Force on Violence and the Family (1996), p. 10.)

·       an average of 28% of high school and college students experience dating  violence at some point. (Brustin, S., Legal Response to Teen Dating Violence, Family Law Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2, 331 (Summer1995).)

·       victims of dating violence report the abuse takes many forms: insults, humiliation, monitoring the victim’s movements, isolation of the victim from family and friends, suicide threats, threats to harm family or property, and physical or sexual abuse.  their abusers also blamed them for the abuse, or used jealousy as as excuse. (Brustin, S., Legal Response to Teen Dating Violence, Family Law Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2, 336 (Summer 1995) (citing Gamache, Domination and control; The Social Context of Dating Violence, Young Women in Danger, Levy, ed. 1991).)

STALKING

Batterers may attempt to frighten or control their victims through stalking.

some advocates believe up to 80% of stalking cases occur within intimate relationships.

 (Domestic Violence, Stalking and Anti-stalking Legislation, an Annual Report to congress under the Violence Against Women Act, April 1996, p. 3.)

BATTERED IMMIGRANT WOMEN

Battered immigrant women face unique legal, social and economic problems.

·       a battered woman who is not a legal resident, or whose immigration status depends on her partner, is isolated by cultural dynamics which may prevent her from leaving her partner or seeking assistance from the legal system.  These factors contribute to the higher incidence of abuse among immigrant women. (Orloff et al., With No Place to Turn: Improving Advocacy for Battered  Immigrant Women, Family Law Quarterly, vol. 29, No. 2, 313 (Summer 1995).)

·       some obstacles faced by battered immigrant women include:  a distrust  of the legal system arising from their experiences with the system in their native countries;  cultural and language barriers; and fear of deportation. (Orloff et al., With No Place to Turn: Improving Advocacy for Battered Immigrant Women, Family Law Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2 313 (Summer 1995).)

·       although a victim may be in the country legally by virtue of her marriage to the batterer, their status may be conditional; in this situation it is common for a batterer to exert his control over his wife’s immigration status in order to force her to remain in the relationship. (Jang,Caught in a  Web: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence, National Clearinghouse (Special Issue 1994), p. 400.)

  • undocumented women may be reported to Immigration and Naturalization Services by law enforcement or social services personnel from whom they seek assistance. (Jang, Caught in a Web: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence, National Clearinghouse (Special Issue 1994), p. 397-399.)             

 

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